Category: “Us-1-Newspaper”

-Dress Code Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

Europeans who come to the United States often think they have a special responsibility to stand up for the lofty values of the Old World, the center of civilization, amid the cultural wastelands of America. Here everyone walks in T-shirts and shorts, chews gum all day, eats only cheeseburgers and doesn’t know how to properly handle a knife and fork — right?

Think again. In the U.S. today, it is precisely my fellow Dutchman who runs the risk of coming across as a boorish farmer. Back in the 1960s, the Dutch and other nations figured out that all social rules are arbitrary and optional. In Holland, personal freedom is happiness. Anything goes. Do it your way.

Not so in American social life, though, where rules are still rules. They are often unspoken, but they are rigorously observed, which creates a certain social insecurity. It’s as if the proper and conformist 1950s have returned. So beware.

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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-Keto Diet Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

Because it is pouring rain, the six men who have been repairing our roof all morning have come inside to have their lunch at our kitchen table. They tell me that their families are originally from Pettoranello del Molise, in the mountains of Italy. There are three young men in their 20s,

two in their 40s, and the foreman, Mario, who is 50-ish. All are on the heavy side. They pull off their caps and wipe sweat from their foreheads. Then they unwrap the food that they have brought from home.

A plastic tray full of baked cauliFower, overFowing with melted cheese, a couple of sticks of butter, a bottle of coconut oil, a bowl of tomatoes, and chopped roast beef. When an enormous slab of bacon is extracted from aluminum foil, a hurrah arises. Time to attack!

Everyone piles bacon on his plate. The sliced butter is smeared over the cauliFower, which is already dripping with cheese and fat. Who needs my tea? They already have thermos jugs steaming with hot coffee spiked with coconut oil. Delicious! they all say. This is the tastiest diet we have ever followed!

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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-Fulfillment Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

I am driving through the tranquil New Jersey countryside near Robbinsville when a mirage suddenly rises out of the mists in front of me. It is the gigantic Hindu temple BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir. This fairytale building, the largest Hindu temple in the world, is breathtaking in its splendor: sculpted Italian marble, Turkish limestone, almost Gve million man-hours of carved Indian sculptures. This improbable exotic sight is only a few miles away from the bare and austere Protestant church in the nearby town.

I take off my shoes and walk inside in my socks. People sightseeing seem to Joat between marble pillars embellished with carved elephants. Worshippers exuberantly pour water over the head of a sculpted child in an idyllic garden. The mood of the whole temple is festive. The elephants are happy, the dancers in the murals are smiling, the golden images of the gods are festooned with Jowers. Outside this morning there was frost on the grass.

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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-Meanwhile 2 Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

I am seven years old. I have left my school early. The teacher has sent me to the house of my best friend, Tilly. She lives a short distance outside the village, in a farm between the meadows. Today she stayed

home because she did not feel well. I’ve walked this road often, but never without Tilly. It’s a little after 12 noon, hot and quiet. A few birds are perched on the barbed wire fences. There are deep cracks in the dirt road, and I do my best not to trip over loose stones. My knee socks have sagged, as have the hems of my green plaid skirt. The school is far behind me, a dot on the horizon. In front of me I see the low roof of Tilly’s farmhouse. I stop, hearing an airplane that traces a wispy line high in the sky. I follow it with my Dnger.

And then it happens. Out of nowhere I realize, in full force, that I am “Me.” Not my parents. Not Tilly. Just me, myself, and I. I exist. Here and now. I awake to my own life, in which I play the leading role. It is an overwhelming experience. I have crossed a threshold. I left one world and, with the shock of recognition, have discovered my own. How long I stood there on that sandy road under the burning sun with my new insight, I do not know. Not even how the rest of the afternoon went. I know I did not tell anyone. I never forgot, but I could not explain it either. But from that moment on, everything was different.

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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-Nothing Goes Unnoticed Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

A dozen people sit down at a huge conference table on the 25th

8oor of a skyscraper in Manhattan. In the middle of the table is a

long slit bristling with charging outlets. One at a time we plug into

the slot our smart phones, notebook computers, and iPads, and

settle in behind our devices.

On the screen of the woman sitting next to me an image of a red

beating heart suddenly lights up. She blushes and quickly deletes

it. Zip! The man across from me pulls his iPad out of its charger

and stands up to take a panoramic picture of the view of the

Freedom Tower under a sky Jlled with snow 8urries. Back at the

conference table he sends off the photo in an email. Zip!

My shoes get entangled in a jumble of cables under the table.

Where are they going? Where is that place where all our

messages, photos, fears, losses, and desires are sent forever?

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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Pia de Jong: Teaching Math in America

US 1 Newspaper

-Math In America Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

Is there anything more di0cult than being a public school teacher
in America? Yes, being a math or science teacher in New York
City. If you are teaching in New York, you start with the problems
that all teachers struggle with: students with behavior problems,
demanding parents, apathetic parents, administrative burdens,
paltry resources, long hours, and skimpy wages. Many teachers
take two jobs just to get by. Then in New York, you can throw into
this combustible stew the social issues around inequality,
violence, and racism. Add to that the particular obstacles math
and science pose for many students.
There are nearly two thousand public schools in NYC with more
than a million children. Many teachers have so little money for
their supplies that they dig into their own pockets to buy pencils
and paper for their pupils. Little wonder that some give up and
are lured to Wall Street, where the salaries are many times higher.
What’s the solution? Begin by throwing a party.

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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-Microaggressions Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

There is a fast-growing inequality in American life — in political correctness and its consequences. You can see the fault lines most clearly between generations. The baby boomers and older people are acting and talking the free-wheeling, damn- the-torpedoes way they always did. Politicians routinely resort to offensive language, the president ridicules the appearance of women, and the government itself tries to reverse LGBT emancipation. Younger people like millennials, on the other hand, are becoming more and more Dnely sensitive to offensive statements, and never mind how small or unintended. This subject is central to the curriculum taught to students on every high school and college campus.

Last week I greeted one of my daughter’s Latina friends from across the street. “Hi, Louisa,” I called. My daughter turned to me in shock. It was not Louisa, but Mariana, another Latina girl. “Mom,” she protested. “That is one of your typical micro- aggressions. You give the impression that you think all Latinas are the same.”

I did not deliberately intend to insult the girlfriend by confusing her with someone else of the same ethnicity, but of course it was too late. I did not get away with saying that their hairstyles were very similar. No, I was unintentionally a racist.

It was time for my daughter to give me a crash course from her school curriculum about “micro-aggressions.”

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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Raising a Foodie

US 1 Newspaper, August 8, 2018

-Foodies Eliane
Illustration by Eliane Gerrits

The first time our elder son seemed to understand food was at a McDonald’s. During a vacation, we had picked up a hamburger for him. He approached it with caution. First, he began to carefully dismantle it. He removed the pieces of onion, the ketchup, and the slice of pickle, then the wilted lettuce and the meat. The result was a soggy piece of bread with a slice of tomato that must have turned red from embarrassment. Thus was born the delicious “tomato sandwich,” still a fixture on our family menus.

Posted in: US 1 Newspaper
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Saving Charlotte: A Mother and the Power of Intuition
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